4 Tips for Re-Writing Learning Content

A SME hands you their source material for a critical training project. You thumb through the document and after the title page, a mission statement, the steering committee bios, and a Sun Tzu quote, you stumble upon this:

This training was designed to increase the understanding and the ability of Level III safety auditors to adhere to (company name) standard operating procedures for objectively and efficiently assessing departmental compliance to four key excellence criteria…

Got that? No? Well, neither will your audience. So now what? How do you turn wordy corporate speak into compelling, purposeful content?

1. Speak to the individual

When it comes to writing learning content, information and ideas need to connect at an individual level and it’s our job to transform that raw content in a way that speaks to and with the individual.

  • Imagine yourself in a conversation with one person and use that language to re-convey the ideas. You can always refine it later, but at least you’re starting with an authentic, conversational tone.
  • Ask SMEs to paraphrase their wordy corporate speak. Have them explain it to you in their own words. Then use those words as the basis for rewriting the schlock.

2. It’s all about them

You might disagree with me, but fundamentally, no one cares about your company/business/organization/department – at least not right off the bat. They also don’t care about your mission statement, your CEO’s strategic plan, or your 4 pillars of customer service. People care about themselves. What’s in it for me? That’s what connects ideas to actions. Learning shouldn’t be about what you want to tell them; it should be about what they need to know and do.

  • Focus first on their problems, their needs, and their real-life situations and then you can talk about your great ideas for addressing them.
  • Put your writing through the “we” test. Count the number of times you’ve used “we” words, like we, us, our, or your company name, and then compare it to the number of times you’ve used “you” words. If the we’s have it, YOU’VE got a problem.

3. Avoid superlatives

Typical business writing is riddled with vague superlatives like “excellence” and “quality.” But what do those words really mean? Excellence for one person isn’t the same for another and defining excellence on your terms doesn’t exactly encourage internalization of the concepts or foster new behaviors. If you really want to engage and motivate, stop telling your learners how special and important everything is, and start showing them, specifically, what to care about and why. Provide examples through things like scenarios, case studies, or let them hear from their peers and reach their own conclusions about the adjectives and the adverbs. 

4. Get to the point

I’ll admit it: economy is not my strong suit, but even I know that more words do not equal better content. In a world where we are bombarded with information all day long, lightening the cognitive load is more than considerate, it’s smart. Keeping your writing pointed and purposeful helps your audience focus on the most critical information, shows respect for their time and energy, and increases the odds of the really important bits actually sticking.

Fundamentally, design is about making choices and in the case of that stereotypical bullet-riddled SME slide, the best thing you can do for your audience, your organization and yourself is to step up and ask: What’s really important here? How can we present this information more efficiently? Case in point: Below, on the left is a lengthy list of interesting (and shocking) facts about Diabetes. But what’s the key message hidden in all those bullets? On the right is a more succinct and impactful list that’s a lot easier to read and comprehend.

BEFORE

BEFORE: Too. Many. Words. Ugh.

AFTER: Critical info is called out and we’ve only included the stats that support it.